5 Signs You Are An Addict

5 Signs You Are An Addict

This may seem funny or obvious to some people but, when in the tight grip of a drug addiction, it can be hard to see what is really going on. Addiction is an insidious condition that can sneak up on you and before you know it, that recreational drug use you like to call “partying” has become a full-blown addiction. Often referred to as denial, it’s like the saying goes, “you can’t see the forest for the trees.” Here are five telltale signs you are an addict.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Tolerance

You find that you need more and more of a substance or substances in order to achieve the same effect that you used to get when you first started using. This means that you have built up a tolerance to the drug or drugs.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Dependence

If you try to stop or go too long without drugs, you experience symptoms such as nausea, restlessness, insomnia, depression, sweating, shaking, and anxiety. You find that you need to take drugs to avoid or relieve these withdrawal symptoms. This is known as physical dependence.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Loss of Control

You can no longer reel yourself in or limit your drug use; you’ve lost control over it. You often tell yourself you won’t use but then find yourself using or using more than you had planned. You may want to stop using, but you feel like you are unable to stop. In a word, powerless.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Obsession

You spend a lot of time and money using and thinking about drugs, and figuring out ways to get them, and recovering from their effects. You start to realize that your life revolves around your drug use. This is the psychological dependence of being an addict.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Lack of Interest

You’ve abandoned activities you used to enjoy, such as hobbies, sports, and socializing, because of your drug use. You don’t spend time with friends or family, instead, the only people, if any, that you hang out with are now your “using” buddies. One of the most obvious signs you are an addict to others is that you have an overall lack of interest in life.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Consequences

You start experience a number of different consequences: health, financial, social/relationship, even legal, yet you continue to use drugs. Despite knowing it’s hurting you, you simply cannot stop your drug use. It’s causing major problems in your life—blackouts, infections, mood swings, depression, paranoia, loss of your job, drug-related arrests—but you use anyway.

 

The good news is that drug addiction is a condition that is treatable. If you or someone you love is showing signs of being an addict, there is drug treatment available for substance abuse and addiction. You don’t have to go on suffering. Recognizing the signs you are an addict is the first step in getting help and getting your life back on track.

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.helpguide.org/

 

 

Ritalin Abuse

Ritalin AbuseA growing number of young people are snorting Ritalin — a much-lauded drug for hyperactive children — to lose weight, study for exams and in some cases, just to get high, according to some drug experts. Teens and 20-somethings are the key abusers, and some even go to their doctors and fake symptoms in order to get prescriptions for Ritalin that they subsequently misuse themselves, and even sell to their friends, experts said. There has been a six-fold increase in emergency room visits associated to Ritalin abuse over the past decade, according to the Drug Abuse Warning Network, which tracks drug abuse data for federal health authorities. There were 271 Ritalin-related emergency room visits in 1990 and 1,478 visits in 2001.

What is Ritalin?

Ritalin is the common name for methylphenidate, classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration as a Schedule II narcotic—the same classification as cocaine, morphine and amphetamines.1 It is abused by teens for its stimulant effects. Even when Ritalin is used as a prescription drug, it may have severe effects including nervousness, insomnia, anorexia, loss of appetite, pulse changes, heart problems and weight loss. The manufacturer says it is a drug of dependency.

What are the effects of Ritalin abuse?

Ritalin (methylphenidate) is a central nervous system stimulant, similar to amphetamines in the nature and duration of its effects. It is believed that it works by activating the brain stem arousal system and cortex. Pharmacologically, it works on the neurotransmitter dopamine, and in that respect resembles the stimulant characteristics of cocaine. Short-term effects can include nervousness and insomnia, loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, palpitations, headaches, changes in heart rate and blood pressure (usually elevation of both, but occasionally depression), skin rashes and itching, abdominal pain, weight loss, and digestive problems, toxic psychosis, psychotic episodes, drug dependence syndrome, and severe depression upon withdrawal.

High doses of stimulants produce a predictable set of symptoms that include loss of appetite (may cause serious malnutrition), tremors and muscle twitching, fevers, convulsions, and headaches (may be severe), irregular heartbeat and respirations (may be profound and life threatening), anxiety, restlessness, paranoia, hallucinations, and delusions, excessive repetition of movements and meaningless tasks, and formicaton (sensation of bugs or worms crawling under the skin).

Children and adults prescribed Ritalin to treat ADHD or narcolepsy do not appear to develop tolerance to its therapeutic effects, but abusers develop tolerance to the effects they seek from the drug. Chronic heavy use can lead to physical dependence, and withdrawal symptoms include exhaustion and severe emotional depression. Ritalin abusers who become psychologically dependent may experience cravings for the drug and feelings of panic if the drug becomes temporarily unavailable.

Amphetamine abuse such as Ritalin abuse is big problem in the country and unfortunately it is affecting the younger population. The best way of course to help someone who you know has a Ritalin abuse problem is to send them to drug rehab. Also look for alternatives to Ritalin to help with ADD. The less people are prescribed the drug the less it can be abused.

Changes in the DSM 5

changes in the DSM 5

The DSM-5, short for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, is the latest update to the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) classification and diagnostic tool. It is used for diagnosing psychiatric disorders and also makes treatment recommendations for these disorders. Because there is always new research and findings in the medical field and especially in regards to psychological illnesses and disorders, there are changes in the DSM 5.

The DSM is like an encyclopedia of mental illness concepts and definitions, which change over time. Therefore the changes in the DSM 5 can be seen in this current version – the fifth edition, published on May 18, 2013.

Changes in the DSM 5: Substance Use and Addictive Disorders

The first noticeable difference to the section on substance use and addictive disorders is that it is laid out differently.  Whereas previously organized according to the diagnosis, such as use, intoxication, and withdrawal, new changes in the DSM 5 reflect chapter order and numbering that is designated according to the specific substance.

Changes in the DSM 5: Substance-Related and Addictive Disorders

Some major and apparent changes in the DSM 5 are that gambling disorder and tobacco use disorder are now recognized. Also, criteria for marijuana (cannabis) and caffeine withdrawal were added.

A new “addictions and related disorders” category combines substance abuse and substance dependence into single substance use disorders specific to each substance of abuse.

Instead of the term of “recurrent legal problems” as part of the criteria, changes in the DSM 5 now use “craving or a strong desire or urge to use a substance” in the diagnostic criteria. The DSM 5 also uses a spectrum of severe-to-mild; severity from mild to severe is based on the number of criteria endorsed. And the threshold of the number of criteria that must be met was changed.

Other Changes in the DSM 5

  • Hallucinogen Disorders have now include Phencyclidine (PCP) Disorders
  • Sedative, Hypnotic, or Anxiolytic Disorders now called Sedative/Hypnotic-Related Disorders
  • Amphetamine and Cocaine Disorders now called Stimulant Disorders
  • Removal of Substance-Induced Dissociative Disorder
  • Minor wording changes to most of the criteria
  • Added criteria for Hallucinogen Persisting Perception Disorder
  • Added criteria for Neurobehavioral Disorder Associated With Prenatal Alcohol
  • Added criteria for Caffeine Use Disorder
  • Added criteria for Internet Use Disorder
  • Added criteria for Drug Specific “Not Elsewhere Classified” diagnoses

Concerns Regarding the Changes in the DSM 5

Because of the re-structuring that is based on the specific substance, there are concerns that first-time substance abusers will be lumped in with hard-core addicts. This is problematic because of their very different treatment needs and prognosis as well as the stigma this may cause.

Changes in the DSM 5 have also created a slippery slope by introducing the concept of Behavioral Addictions (i.e. gambling, internet, sex) that eventually can be used to make everything we enjoy doing a lot into a mental disorder. There is concern that this sort of thing can lead to careless over-diagnosis of internet and sex addiction and result in the development of lucrative treatment programs to exploit these new markets.

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.dsm5.org/

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

 

Are Sleeping Pills Addictive?

Are sleeping pills addictive?

are sleeping pills addictive?About a third and half of all people in the United States have insomnia and complain of getting poor sleep. In fact if you are reading this, you may be one of them. If so you may be considering taking a sleeping pill or are already taking one.

Sleeping pills may be effective for sleep problems for a short period of time but it is extremely important that you make sure to understand everything you need to know about sleeping pills including if they are addictive.

So what are sleeping pills?

Most sleeping pills are also sedative hypnotics. Sedative hypnotics are specific class of drugs used to induce and maintain sleep. Sedative hypnotics include everything from benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and various hypnotics. Benzodiazepines are drugs like Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and Librium. These drugs cause sedation and can increase drowsiness and help people sleep. Benzodiazepines are potentially addictive. Barbiturates are another drug in the sedative hypnotic class that can cause sedation. Short or long term barbiturates are prescribed as sedatives or sleeping pills but are mainly used for anesthesia.

Newer medications for sleep and the ones you are probably thinking of are sleep-inducing drugs such as Lunesta, Sonata and Ambien. These drugs are said to be non-habit forming or in other words non-addictive. They work quickly to increase drowsiness and sleep.

Sleeping pills have side effects like almost all medications. You won’t know if you have any adverse reactions to sleeping pills until you take them. Here are some of the many side effects of taking prescription sleeping pills such as Lunesta, Sonata, Ambien, Rozerem, and Halcion:

  • Burning or tingling in the hands, arms, feet, or legs
  • Changes in appetite
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty keeping balance
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Dry mouth or throat
  • Gas
  • Headache
  • Heartburn
  • Stomach pain or tenderness
  • Uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • Unusual dreams
  • Weakness

But what about addiction? Are sleeping pills addictive?

The makers of sleeping pills tout their medications as being non-habit forming but there are actual definitions for sleeping pill addiction and stories of people becoming addicted to sleeping pills.

A sleeping pill addiction is defined as the desire to use sleeping pills on a regular basis. Frequent use can lead to dependence on sleeping pills. Sleeping pills can also slowly build up a tolerance in the user. Many people will also use sleeping pills to achieve the desired euphoric feeling that they can produce. A sleeping pill addiction also has many symptoms including the uncontrollable craving for sleeping pills as well as obsessive thoughts about sleeping pills and an excessive amount of money spent on sleeping pills. Here are some of the physical symptoms of sleeping pill addiction:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Confusion
  • Runny nose
  • Glazed eyes
  • Red eyes
  • Persistent cough
  • Forgetfulness
  • Increased sensitivity to sounds
  • Increased sensitivity to emotions
  • Rapid speech
  • Excessive energy
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Unusual selling of private property
  • Social isolation
  • Poor work performance
  • Poor school performance
  • Neglect of family responsibilities
  • Neglect of personal hygiene
  • Insomnia
  • Personality changes

So are sleeping pills addictive? Definitely go ahead and be cautious and say yes, yes they are.

What Can Molly Be Cut With?

What Can Molly Be Cut With?

what can molly be cut with

The term Molly refers to pure MDMA, which is a drug known for enhancing physical sensations. That is, the sense of touch is heightened, taste is altered and may seem different from the norm, and many people say that music sounds better. In general, there is an awareness of the moment and contentment with being in the moment.

After coming down, molly users experience the blues, also called Suicide Tuesday, but there are other more serious consequences. The involuntary jaw clenching that many users experience while high on molly can cause damage to their back teeth. Also, there have been numerous cases of Molly-induced hepatitis and, more seriously, liver failure. People who repeatedly take molly may also suffer from a range of psychological problems, like paranoia, anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia and nightmares.

Molly Is Not Always Pure

Because molly is a powder in substance and might be sold in capsules, it can be cut, or mixed with virtually anything. Cutting, or stepping on, the product is a practice among drug dealers in order to spread out the amount of the actual drug so as to increase profit. This results in the dilution of the drug, since it’s been mixed with other things, and therefore a less intense high.

Like other powder-like drugs, molly can be cut with anything from other less-expensive drugs to everyday, household items. Therefore, you can run more risk by taking molly because it is difficult to know the purity of the product as well as the possibility of side effects and interactions you may experience from whatever molly is cut with.

What Can Molly Be Cut With: Meth

Some people will describe an experience on molly that was different from other times in the past and since. They say they got a “speedy” batch, experiencing a much harder come-down where they crash for a couple of days afterwards. Likely, the molly they got was cut with meth or some other amphetamine.

What Can Molly Be Cut With: Heroin

Although unlikely because it just wouldn’t be profitable to do, I have heard stories of Molly possibly being cut with heroin. For some people, the idea of this is pretty scary but, if you think about it, heroin and molly are equally as scary. So why suddenly discriminate what it is you’re willing to put into your body?

What Can Molly Be Cut With: Everyday Items

Again, because it comes in a powder form, molly can be cut with anything else that resembles it, such as baby powder, laxatives, or baking soda. Most likely, you won’t really notice if this is the case except if you snort it or taste it first. Also, the main indication that your molly was cut with one of these substances or something like them is that your high will not be as intense as you are used to or were expecting.

So, what can molly be cut with? Anything you can think of really. Your best bet is to get a drug-testing kit so that you can be sure of what it is that you’re about to put in your body.

Alcohol Overdose Symptoms

Alcohol Overdose Symptoms

Alcohol Overdose SymptomsDrinking is common. Drinking happens at parties, holidays, while cheering on our favorite sports teams and even during common activities. And while drinking is accepted and totally normal it can become dangerous if someone is drinking to excess which even at these events can happen.

Many people enjoy drinking moderately. Drinking moderately is defined as having 1 drink per day for women and 2 for men. Drinking more than moderately or drinking too much can lead to an alcohol overdose. Alcohol overdose happens when a person has blood alcohol content (BAC) sufficient enough to produce impairments that increase the risk of them harming themselves and even others. Alcohol overdoses can range in severity from problems with balance and slurred speech to even coma or death. Age, drinking experience, gender and the amount of food eaten as well as ethnicity can all influence how much alcohol is too much.

So how do you know how much is too much? What are the alcohol overdose symptoms?

Critical or severe alcohol overdose symptoms include:

  • Mental confusion, stupor, coma, or inability to wake up
  • Vomiting
  • Seizures
  • Slow breathing (fewer than 8 breaths per minute)
  • Irregular breathing (10 seconds or more between breaths)
  • Hypothermia (low body temperature), bluish skin color, paleness

Other alcohol overdose symptoms include:

  • Knowing the person has consumed large quantities of alcohol
  • The person is unconscious and cannot be woken up
  • Person vomits while passed and does not wake up during or after

Know the danger signals or signs that someone is getting close to an alcohol overdose can help significantly in preventing an alcohol overdose. Someone who has a severe impairment but is not exhibiting life threatening symptoms will have signs such as:

  • Speech, memory, coordination, attention, reaction time, balance problems
  • Judgment and decision making will be severely impaired
  • Vomiting and other signs of alcohol poisoning
  • The beginning stages of loss of consciousness

What will happen if someone who has alcohol overdose symptoms and doesn’t get treated?

  • They could end up choking on their own vomit
  • Breathing that slows, become irregular, or stops
  • Heart that beats irregularly stops
  • Hypothermia can lead to death
  • Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) leads to seizures
  • Untreated severe dehydration from vomiting which can cause seizures, permanent brain damage and death.

Alcohol overdose symptoms are extremely dangerous and should be taken very seriously. Someone who is experiencing any alcohol overdose symptoms should be taken to a hospital immediately or 911 should be called. Here are some things you can do if you know someone is experiencing alcohol overdose symptoms:

1. Try to wake the person. Try to wake the person by calling their name, slapping their face, or pinching their skin. See if you can get a reaction that will wake the person up. Remember, just because they wake up doesn’t mean they are fine. Alcohol stays in the bloodstream until it is processed and just because you can get some reaction at 1:00 AM doesn’t mean they will still be conscious by 2:00 AM. Do not leave the person alone.

2. Check the person’s breathing. Evaluate if the person has slow or irregular breaths; less than 8 times per minute or more than 10 seconds between breaths. If they are not conscious or barely able to wake up, we need to make sure they don’t choke on their own vomit.

3. Turn the person on his/her side to prevent choking. If they are not conscious or barely able to wake up, we begin by making sure they don’t choke on their vomit. Start by putting their arm above their head. Bend their opposite knee and roll them toward you so that they are laying on their side, preferably their left side. Putting the person on their left side will slow the delivery of alcohol to the small intestine and also allows more air to surface from the right lung. This way, if they do throw up, the vomit will have a better chance of coming out.

4. Do not leave the person alone. Although it might be inconvenient, it is important to stay with someone who is extremely drunk and barely conscious. Continue to monitor their breathing, responsiveness, skin and lip color, etc.

5. If any of signs of alcohol poisoning exist, call 911

http://www.bacchusnetwork.org/poisoning-signs-symptoms.html

http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AlcoholOverdoseFactsheet/Overdosefact.htm

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

In active addiction, we often get caught up in a cycle of guilt and shame about using drugs and our using behaviors. On some level, we recognize that this isn’t our true identity yet the grip of addiction is so tight, that we cannot simply stop doing the things that we feel guilty and shameful about. And then, we use again and more in order to numb ourselves from the feelings of guilt and shame. This is essentially the cycle of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that shows how guilt and shame fuels addiction.

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

The guilt and shame from the past leaves us feeling unworthy of being loved. As a result of the lies we tell ourselves, we have learned to lie in order to cover up who we believe we really are, and then we act out in ways that this guilt and shame fuels addiction.

We view our wrong behavior or failings as a reflection of who we are, our true identity.

When we do something bad or make a mistake, we take that as evidence that we are flawed.

We are very hard on ourselves and so normal errors and mistakes are blown out of proportion and reveal our true nature, which is flawed.

We feel overwhelmed when we experience such a mistake because we think it reveals that something is terribly wrong with us.

We accept part of the blame when others hurt, wrong, or violate us.

We see ourselves as someone who deserves to be abused, punished, or treated poorly.

We believe the behavior or lifestyle is the natural to us as bad people and therefore that it is futile to avoid or stop shame-producing behavior, further fueling addiction.

Whenever we experience a normal human failing, make an honest mistake, or suffer a disappointment, it triggers a downward spiral of depression and addictive behavior.

We think that trying to change our life for the better is somehow living a lie or being hypocritical, instead as evidence that we can change.

We may appear to be shameless to others when, in fact we are being eaten up by shame and guilt.

We are eventually worn down to the point that we give in to our overwhelming shame and then act out in ways that show no sense of shame or guilt.

 The Cycle of Guilt and Shame

When someone is addicted to alcohol and/or drugs, it usually causes them to feel guilt and shame about their addiction. When we can’t stop our addictive behavior, we think it means that there is some sort of weakness or inability on our part that makes us unworthy. We become dependent on something outside of ourselves (alcohol and drugs) to give a sense of well-being. We feel weak and needy on this substance which causes us to feel ashamed of our weakness, and then in turn intensifies our neediness. Addiction creates a cycle of ever increasing addictive behavior resulting in guilt and shame which in turn motivates an increase in dependence on the addiction for comfort.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

Dangers of Molly the Drug (“molly the drug”)

Dangers of Molly the Drug (“molly the drug”)

We’re guessing you already know what molly is if you are wondering about the many dangers of molly the drug. But just in case you don’t know what molly the drug is let us clarify quickly what we are talking about;

We’re not talking about the girl you had a crush on in 5th grade math class or your best friend you spent your summers with, obviously.

We’re talking about Molly the drug.

Molly is the street name for pure MDMA. Molly is different than ecstasy pills or “E” because it comes in powder form or in capsules that are commonly more “clean” or pure than the “E” pills. The term Molly was derived from the word molecule. The idea that molly the drug is more pure gives its users, possibly you, the idea that is also safer. This just isn’t true. Molly the drug can be cut with other substances easily or it can be confused with other powdered substances. And this is just the beginning of the dangers of molly the drug.

So what does molly the drug do?

The primary effects of molly the drug are pretty consistent among all users. In general the molly drug takes on its effects within 45 minutes to an hour after consumption and hits a peak after 2 to 3 hours. After the peak molly drug hits a plateau that last about 2 to 3 more hours followed by a comedown. Molly the drug causes significant positive effects in its users. Effects such as:

•             An alteration in consciousness

•             A strong sense of inner peace and self-acceptance

•             Diminished fear, anxiety, and insecurity

•             Diminished aggression, hostility, and jealousy

•             Feelings of intimacy and love for others

•             Feelings of empathy, compassion and forgiveness towards others

•             Increased energy and endurance

•             Mild psychedelic, mental imagery and auditory and visual distortions or hallucinations

•             Improved self confidence

•             Increased drive, desire and motivation

•             The ability to talk about normally anxiety provoking issues

•             An intensification of all bodily senses

•             Stimulation, arousal and enhancement of appreciation of music

Now that you know how much fun molly the drug can be, it may be good if you ask the most important questions like, “what are the dangers of molly the drug?”

There are some immediate dangers to using the molly the drug. Molly the drug’s short-term side effects are quite alarming. Molly the drug interferes with the brain’s essential chemical functions. It kind of makes a scrambled egg out your brain. Molly the drug mixes up the temperature signals to the brain which can cause hypothermia, dehydration, or heat stroke.

The dangers of molly the drug are also things such as:

•             Blurred vision

•             Faintness

•             High blood pressure

•             Muscle cramping

•             Confusion

•             Panic attacks

So just how dangerous are the dangers of molly the drug?

Let’s just put it simply. You could die. You could also live. But the more important thing is that you realize the dangers of molly the drug; which in some worst case scenarios is death.

In some severe cases people have died from the dangers of molly the drug due to:

•             Seizures

•             Strokes

•             Cardiovascular and kidney failure

•             Dehydration

The amount of deaths involving molly the drug have increased because some people assume if you die from it you’re just not using it the “right way”.

Wait were not done with the dangers of molly the drug.

Another danger of molly the drug is that it has tons of interactions with other drugs. So if you’re planning on drinking a beer, doing some coke, LSD, or even taking just taking your allergy medicine with molly the drug-be careful. These molly drug cocktail combos can make the dangers of molly the drug, well, even more dangerous.

Your best bet against the dangers of molly the drug is just not to use it.

The best idea when using any drug is to know your facts and to be safe. Every drug including molly the drug has it dangers so it is best to just either practice abstaining or get as much information as you can on the substance.

Do Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery work?

Do Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery work?

Rational Recovery

Rational Recovery refers to a counseling, guidance, and direct instruction program for addiction. It was created in direct contrast to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and other twelve-step programs. The Rational Recovery method is to first make a commitment to planned, permanent abstinence from the substance or behavior, and then learn mental tools to keep that commitment.

The Addictive Voice

The addictive voice, according Rational Recovery, is the most important thing for the recovering addict to be aware of, as well as a determination to remain abstinent based on their rational decision to quit. The addictive voice is the addict’s irrational mind telling them to use drugs. The recovering addict must disregard this voice and connect with their rational decision to stay away from drugs. The idea is, the longer they person is able to disregard their addictive voice, the more connected to the rational decision to abstain they become and begin to see the benefits of staying clean.

Practical Recovery

The Practical Recovery approach is basically the same as SMART Recovery: a secular and science-based program that uses behavioral and cognitive non-confrontational methods of motivation. Practical Recovery emphasizes individualized therapy. Like AA, there are free meetings in which you can learn recovery methods from evidence-based addiction treatments.

Empowerment

Both of these approaches boast “self-empowerment.” The founders and followers of Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery do not agree with the 12 Step approach that people are powerless. These approaches to recovery are also opposed to the use of religious and spiritual speech such as that used in Alcoholics Anonymous and so they take a science-based methodology, focusing on behavioral and cognitive tools to addressing addiction.

History

When it comes to historical basis, AA has a lot more to show for itself: AA was founded back in 1935 whereas Rational Recovery is quite new, being founded in 1986. That alone isn’t enough to say whether one approach is more effective than the other. However, there are still AA and other 12 Step fellowship meetings taking place to date and in a number of countries around the world, even Egypt, Zimbabwe, and Thailand. Rational Recovery meetings have since been disbanded by the founders based upon the premise that meetings are a waste of time and ineffective. Some followers of the program have continued to gather in meetings despite the disbandment, although their numbers are dwindling.

 So, do Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery work?

It’s hard to say, really. These two approaches have not been around as long as Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12 Step programs and there hasn’t been much research on the efficacy of their approach to addiction. The irony is that there isn’t much evidence for evidence-based addiction approaches such as Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery.

It all comes down to the person who is recovering from an addiction and their willingness to commit to a life without drugs and alcohol. This kind of commitment takes work and dedication to some kind of program that will support them in their goal of long lasting sobriety.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://psychologytoday.com/

The Most Dangerous Drug in The World

The Most Dangerous Drug in the World

I am not sure if you can label one drug as the most dangerous drug in the world but if you could and did many think it would be the notorious stimulant meth.  Meth is highly addictive, extremely hard to quit, insanely destructive and running rampant from major metropolitan areas to rural communities and then on into the world.

So what is it exactly about meth that makes it the most dangerous drug in the world? Let’s take a look.

Meth, otherwise known as: Crank, crypto, crystal, fire, glass, tweek, white cross, Tina, and crystal meth.

What is meth?

Meth or methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that strongly activates certain systems in the brain. Meth is usually a crystal-like powdered substance that can sometimes come in large rock-like chunks. When the powder flakes off the rock, the shards look like glass which is actually a nickname for meth. Meth is usually white or slightly yellow depending on the purity of it. Meth can be used by mouth, snorted through the nose, smoked or inhaled, and also injected with a needle (IV use).

Because of meth’s different and numerous methods of use as well as its ability to activate the pleasure centers of the brain definitely help to make it one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

What are the harmful effects of meth?

Part of the intense addiction to meth stems from what meth users call a “rush”. Shortly after smoking or injecting meth, meth users feel an intense sensation of euphoria that only lasts a few minutes and is described as extremely pleasurable. Snorting or swallowing meth produces euphoria (the high) but not the “rush” of it. After the initial “rush,” there is usually a state of high agitation that in some individuals can lead to violent behavior. This is can either be due to the effects of the drug or because they want more of it. Other possible immediate effects of meth include increased wakefulness and insomnia, decreased appetite, irritability/aggression, anxiety, nervousness, convulsions and heart attack.

What are its long-term effects? These long term effects are part of what makes meth one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

Methamphetamine is addictive, and users can develop a tolerance quickly, needing larger amounts to get high. In some cases, users forego food and sleep and take more meth every few hours for days, ‘binging’ until they run out of the drug or become too disorganized to continue. Chronic use can cause paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive behavior (such as compulsively cleaning, grooming or disassembling and assembling objects), and delusions of parasites or insects crawling under the skin. Users can obsessively scratch their skin to get rid of these imagined insects. Long-term use, high dosages, or both can bring on full-blown toxic psychosis (often exhibited as violent, aggressive behavior). This violent, aggressive behavior is usually coupled with extreme paranoia. Methamphetamine use can also cause strokes and death.

Recovery from meth addiction is also extremely difficult due to the nature of the drug. Many people who are meth addicts will relapse time and time again. This is because of the intense high and effects methamphetamine has on the brain and the body.

Either way meth is definitely one of the most dangerous drugs in the world. If not, the most dangerous drug in the world.