5 Signs You Are An Addict

5 Signs You Are An Addict

This may seem funny or obvious to some people but, when in the tight grip of a drug addiction, it can be hard to see what is really going on. Addiction is an insidious condition that can sneak up on you and before you know it, that recreational drug use you like to call “partying” has become a full-blown addiction. Often referred to as denial, it’s like the saying goes, “you can’t see the forest for the trees.” Here are five telltale signs you are an addict.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Tolerance

You find that you need more and more of a substance or substances in order to achieve the same effect that you used to get when you first started using. This means that you have built up a tolerance to the drug or drugs.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Dependence

If you try to stop or go too long without drugs, you experience symptoms such as nausea, restlessness, insomnia, depression, sweating, shaking, and anxiety. You find that you need to take drugs to avoid or relieve these withdrawal symptoms. This is known as physical dependence.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Loss of Control

You can no longer reel yourself in or limit your drug use; you’ve lost control over it. You often tell yourself you won’t use but then find yourself using or using more than you had planned. You may want to stop using, but you feel like you are unable to stop. In a word, powerless.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Obsession

You spend a lot of time and money using and thinking about drugs, and figuring out ways to get them, and recovering from their effects. You start to realize that your life revolves around your drug use. This is the psychological dependence of being an addict.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Lack of Interest

You’ve abandoned activities you used to enjoy, such as hobbies, sports, and socializing, because of your drug use. You don’t spend time with friends or family, instead, the only people, if any, that you hang out with are now your “using” buddies. One of the most obvious signs you are an addict to others is that you have an overall lack of interest in life.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Consequences

You start experience a number of different consequences: health, financial, social/relationship, even legal, yet you continue to use drugs. Despite knowing it’s hurting you, you simply cannot stop your drug use. It’s causing major problems in your life—blackouts, infections, mood swings, depression, paranoia, loss of your job, drug-related arrests—but you use anyway.

 

The good news is that drug addiction is a condition that is treatable. If you or someone you love is showing signs of being an addict, there is drug treatment available for substance abuse and addiction. You don’t have to go on suffering. Recognizing the signs you are an addict is the first step in getting help and getting your life back on track.

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.helpguide.org/

 

 

Are Sleeping Pills Addictive?

Are sleeping pills addictive?

are sleeping pills addictive?About a third and half of all people in the United States have insomnia and complain of getting poor sleep. In fact if you are reading this, you may be one of them. If so you may be considering taking a sleeping pill or are already taking one.

Sleeping pills may be effective for sleep problems for a short period of time but it is extremely important that you make sure to understand everything you need to know about sleeping pills including if they are addictive.

So what are sleeping pills?

Most sleeping pills are also sedative hypnotics. Sedative hypnotics are specific class of drugs used to induce and maintain sleep. Sedative hypnotics include everything from benzodiazepines, barbiturates, and various hypnotics. Benzodiazepines are drugs like Xanax, Valium, Ativan, and Librium. These drugs cause sedation and can increase drowsiness and help people sleep. Benzodiazepines are potentially addictive. Barbiturates are another drug in the sedative hypnotic class that can cause sedation. Short or long term barbiturates are prescribed as sedatives or sleeping pills but are mainly used for anesthesia.

Newer medications for sleep and the ones you are probably thinking of are sleep-inducing drugs such as Lunesta, Sonata and Ambien. These drugs are said to be non-habit forming or in other words non-addictive. They work quickly to increase drowsiness and sleep.

Sleeping pills have side effects like almost all medications. You won’t know if you have any adverse reactions to sleeping pills until you take them. Here are some of the many side effects of taking prescription sleeping pills such as Lunesta, Sonata, Ambien, Rozerem, and Halcion:

  • Burning or tingling in the hands, arms, feet, or legs
  • Changes in appetite
  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea
  • Difficulty keeping balance
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Dry mouth or throat
  • Gas
  • Headache
  • Heartburn
  • Stomach pain or tenderness
  • Uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • Unusual dreams
  • Weakness

But what about addiction? Are sleeping pills addictive?

The makers of sleeping pills tout their medications as being non-habit forming but there are actual definitions for sleeping pill addiction and stories of people becoming addicted to sleeping pills.

A sleeping pill addiction is defined as the desire to use sleeping pills on a regular basis. Frequent use can lead to dependence on sleeping pills. Sleeping pills can also slowly build up a tolerance in the user. Many people will also use sleeping pills to achieve the desired euphoric feeling that they can produce. A sleeping pill addiction also has many symptoms including the uncontrollable craving for sleeping pills as well as obsessive thoughts about sleeping pills and an excessive amount of money spent on sleeping pills. Here are some of the physical symptoms of sleeping pill addiction:

  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Paranoia
  • Hallucinations
  • Confusion
  • Runny nose
  • Glazed eyes
  • Red eyes
  • Persistent cough
  • Forgetfulness
  • Increased sensitivity to sounds
  • Increased sensitivity to emotions
  • Rapid speech
  • Excessive energy
  • Anxiety
  • Mood swings
  • Unusual selling of private property
  • Social isolation
  • Poor work performance
  • Poor school performance
  • Neglect of family responsibilities
  • Neglect of personal hygiene
  • Insomnia
  • Personality changes

So are sleeping pills addictive? Definitely go ahead and be cautious and say yes, yes they are.

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

In active addiction, we often get caught up in a cycle of guilt and shame about using drugs and our using behaviors. On some level, we recognize that this isn’t our true identity yet the grip of addiction is so tight, that we cannot simply stop doing the things that we feel guilty and shameful about. And then, we use again and more in order to numb ourselves from the feelings of guilt and shame. This is essentially the cycle of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that shows how guilt and shame fuels addiction.

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

The guilt and shame from the past leaves us feeling unworthy of being loved. As a result of the lies we tell ourselves, we have learned to lie in order to cover up who we believe we really are, and then we act out in ways that this guilt and shame fuels addiction.

We view our wrong behavior or failings as a reflection of who we are, our true identity.

When we do something bad or make a mistake, we take that as evidence that we are flawed.

We are very hard on ourselves and so normal errors and mistakes are blown out of proportion and reveal our true nature, which is flawed.

We feel overwhelmed when we experience such a mistake because we think it reveals that something is terribly wrong with us.

We accept part of the blame when others hurt, wrong, or violate us.

We see ourselves as someone who deserves to be abused, punished, or treated poorly.

We believe the behavior or lifestyle is the natural to us as bad people and therefore that it is futile to avoid or stop shame-producing behavior, further fueling addiction.

Whenever we experience a normal human failing, make an honest mistake, or suffer a disappointment, it triggers a downward spiral of depression and addictive behavior.

We think that trying to change our life for the better is somehow living a lie or being hypocritical, instead as evidence that we can change.

We may appear to be shameless to others when, in fact we are being eaten up by shame and guilt.

We are eventually worn down to the point that we give in to our overwhelming shame and then act out in ways that show no sense of shame or guilt.

 The Cycle of Guilt and Shame

When someone is addicted to alcohol and/or drugs, it usually causes them to feel guilt and shame about their addiction. When we can’t stop our addictive behavior, we think it means that there is some sort of weakness or inability on our part that makes us unworthy. We become dependent on something outside of ourselves (alcohol and drugs) to give a sense of well-being. We feel weak and needy on this substance which causes us to feel ashamed of our weakness, and then in turn intensifies our neediness. Addiction creates a cycle of ever increasing addictive behavior resulting in guilt and shame which in turn motivates an increase in dependence on the addiction for comfort.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

Dangers of Molly the Drug (“molly the drug”)

Dangers of Molly the Drug (“molly the drug”)

We’re guessing you already know what molly is if you are wondering about the many dangers of molly the drug. But just in case you don’t know what molly the drug is let us clarify quickly what we are talking about;

We’re not talking about the girl you had a crush on in 5th grade math class or your best friend you spent your summers with, obviously.

We’re talking about Molly the drug.

Molly is the street name for pure MDMA. Molly is different than ecstasy pills or “E” because it comes in powder form or in capsules that are commonly more “clean” or pure than the “E” pills. The term Molly was derived from the word molecule. The idea that molly the drug is more pure gives its users, possibly you, the idea that is also safer. This just isn’t true. Molly the drug can be cut with other substances easily or it can be confused with other powdered substances. And this is just the beginning of the dangers of molly the drug.

So what does molly the drug do?

The primary effects of molly the drug are pretty consistent among all users. In general the molly drug takes on its effects within 45 minutes to an hour after consumption and hits a peak after 2 to 3 hours. After the peak molly drug hits a plateau that last about 2 to 3 more hours followed by a comedown. Molly the drug causes significant positive effects in its users. Effects such as:

•             An alteration in consciousness

•             A strong sense of inner peace and self-acceptance

•             Diminished fear, anxiety, and insecurity

•             Diminished aggression, hostility, and jealousy

•             Feelings of intimacy and love for others

•             Feelings of empathy, compassion and forgiveness towards others

•             Increased energy and endurance

•             Mild psychedelic, mental imagery and auditory and visual distortions or hallucinations

•             Improved self confidence

•             Increased drive, desire and motivation

•             The ability to talk about normally anxiety provoking issues

•             An intensification of all bodily senses

•             Stimulation, arousal and enhancement of appreciation of music

Now that you know how much fun molly the drug can be, it may be good if you ask the most important questions like, “what are the dangers of molly the drug?”

There are some immediate dangers to using the molly the drug. Molly the drug’s short-term side effects are quite alarming. Molly the drug interferes with the brain’s essential chemical functions. It kind of makes a scrambled egg out your brain. Molly the drug mixes up the temperature signals to the brain which can cause hypothermia, dehydration, or heat stroke.

The dangers of molly the drug are also things such as:

•             Blurred vision

•             Faintness

•             High blood pressure

•             Muscle cramping

•             Confusion

•             Panic attacks

So just how dangerous are the dangers of molly the drug?

Let’s just put it simply. You could die. You could also live. But the more important thing is that you realize the dangers of molly the drug; which in some worst case scenarios is death.

In some severe cases people have died from the dangers of molly the drug due to:

•             Seizures

•             Strokes

•             Cardiovascular and kidney failure

•             Dehydration

The amount of deaths involving molly the drug have increased because some people assume if you die from it you’re just not using it the “right way”.

Wait were not done with the dangers of molly the drug.

Another danger of molly the drug is that it has tons of interactions with other drugs. So if you’re planning on drinking a beer, doing some coke, LSD, or even taking just taking your allergy medicine with molly the drug-be careful. These molly drug cocktail combos can make the dangers of molly the drug, well, even more dangerous.

Your best bet against the dangers of molly the drug is just not to use it.

The best idea when using any drug is to know your facts and to be safe. Every drug including molly the drug has it dangers so it is best to just either practice abstaining or get as much information as you can on the substance.

Do Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery work?

Do Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery work?

Rational Recovery

Rational Recovery refers to a counseling, guidance, and direct instruction program for addiction. It was created in direct contrast to Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and other twelve-step programs. The Rational Recovery method is to first make a commitment to planned, permanent abstinence from the substance or behavior, and then learn mental tools to keep that commitment.

The Addictive Voice

The addictive voice, according Rational Recovery, is the most important thing for the recovering addict to be aware of, as well as a determination to remain abstinent based on their rational decision to quit. The addictive voice is the addict’s irrational mind telling them to use drugs. The recovering addict must disregard this voice and connect with their rational decision to stay away from drugs. The idea is, the longer they person is able to disregard their addictive voice, the more connected to the rational decision to abstain they become and begin to see the benefits of staying clean.

Practical Recovery

The Practical Recovery approach is basically the same as SMART Recovery: a secular and science-based program that uses behavioral and cognitive non-confrontational methods of motivation. Practical Recovery emphasizes individualized therapy. Like AA, there are free meetings in which you can learn recovery methods from evidence-based addiction treatments.

Empowerment

Both of these approaches boast “self-empowerment.” The founders and followers of Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery do not agree with the 12 Step approach that people are powerless. These approaches to recovery are also opposed to the use of religious and spiritual speech such as that used in Alcoholics Anonymous and so they take a science-based methodology, focusing on behavioral and cognitive tools to addressing addiction.

History

When it comes to historical basis, AA has a lot more to show for itself: AA was founded back in 1935 whereas Rational Recovery is quite new, being founded in 1986. That alone isn’t enough to say whether one approach is more effective than the other. However, there are still AA and other 12 Step fellowship meetings taking place to date and in a number of countries around the world, even Egypt, Zimbabwe, and Thailand. Rational Recovery meetings have since been disbanded by the founders based upon the premise that meetings are a waste of time and ineffective. Some followers of the program have continued to gather in meetings despite the disbandment, although their numbers are dwindling.

 So, do Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery work?

It’s hard to say, really. These two approaches have not been around as long as Alcoholics Anonymous and other 12 Step programs and there hasn’t been much research on the efficacy of their approach to addiction. The irony is that there isn’t much evidence for evidence-based addiction approaches such as Practical Recovery and Rational Recovery.

It all comes down to the person who is recovering from an addiction and their willingness to commit to a life without drugs and alcohol. This kind of commitment takes work and dedication to some kind of program that will support them in their goal of long lasting sobriety.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/

http://psychologytoday.com/

The Most Dangerous Drug in The World

The Most Dangerous Drug in the World

I am not sure if you can label one drug as the most dangerous drug in the world but if you could and did many think it would be the notorious stimulant meth.  Meth is highly addictive, extremely hard to quit, insanely destructive and running rampant from major metropolitan areas to rural communities and then on into the world.

So what is it exactly about meth that makes it the most dangerous drug in the world? Let’s take a look.

Meth, otherwise known as: Crank, crypto, crystal, fire, glass, tweek, white cross, Tina, and crystal meth.

What is meth?

Meth or methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that strongly activates certain systems in the brain. Meth is usually a crystal-like powdered substance that can sometimes come in large rock-like chunks. When the powder flakes off the rock, the shards look like glass which is actually a nickname for meth. Meth is usually white or slightly yellow depending on the purity of it. Meth can be used by mouth, snorted through the nose, smoked or inhaled, and also injected with a needle (IV use).

Because of meth’s different and numerous methods of use as well as its ability to activate the pleasure centers of the brain definitely help to make it one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

What are the harmful effects of meth?

Part of the intense addiction to meth stems from what meth users call a “rush”. Shortly after smoking or injecting meth, meth users feel an intense sensation of euphoria that only lasts a few minutes and is described as extremely pleasurable. Snorting or swallowing meth produces euphoria (the high) but not the “rush” of it. After the initial “rush,” there is usually a state of high agitation that in some individuals can lead to violent behavior. This is can either be due to the effects of the drug or because they want more of it. Other possible immediate effects of meth include increased wakefulness and insomnia, decreased appetite, irritability/aggression, anxiety, nervousness, convulsions and heart attack.

What are its long-term effects? These long term effects are part of what makes meth one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

Methamphetamine is addictive, and users can develop a tolerance quickly, needing larger amounts to get high. In some cases, users forego food and sleep and take more meth every few hours for days, ‘binging’ until they run out of the drug or become too disorganized to continue. Chronic use can cause paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive behavior (such as compulsively cleaning, grooming or disassembling and assembling objects), and delusions of parasites or insects crawling under the skin. Users can obsessively scratch their skin to get rid of these imagined insects. Long-term use, high dosages, or both can bring on full-blown toxic psychosis (often exhibited as violent, aggressive behavior). This violent, aggressive behavior is usually coupled with extreme paranoia. Methamphetamine use can also cause strokes and death.

Recovery from meth addiction is also extremely difficult due to the nature of the drug. Many people who are meth addicts will relapse time and time again. This is because of the intense high and effects methamphetamine has on the brain and the body.

Either way meth is definitely one of the most dangerous drugs in the world. If not, the most dangerous drug in the world.

 

 

 

 

How to Help a Chronic Relapser

How to Help a Chronic Relapser

What is a Relapse?

Relapse is resuming the use of a drug or a chemical substance after one or more periods of abstinence; a recurrence of symptoms of a disease (addiction) after a period of improvement; to slip or fall back into a former worse state (active addiction).

What is a Chronic Relapser?

Many addicts have a lifetime of drug and alcohol abuse but have never actually attempted to get sober. What makes chronic relapsers distinct is that they have tried and failed at maintaining sobriety many times over.

Profile of the Chronic Relapser

  • Numerous failed attempts at sobriety, or a return to drugs/alcohol after a substantial period of sobriety
  • Unable to maintain sobriety despite having a wealth of knowledge about addiction and recovery
  • Continued substance use despite significant, severe and repeated consequences
  • Chronic relapsers often feel hopeless that they will ever find lasting sobriety
  • Multiple treatment episodes, including psychiatric treatment, detox, residential, outpatient, and halfway houses
  • Significant exposure, attendance and/or participation in 12-Step programs. Chronic relapsers have a history of repeatedly working Steps 1, 2 and 3, but have never completed all 12
  • Treatment-savvy have learned to navigate their way through the treatment industry to meet their own agenda
  • A unique talent to exhaust the financial resources and emotional support of loved ones. Chronic relapsers leave their loved ones depleted of energy and emotional resources
  • As with most addicts, a pervasive cluster of personality characteristics are frequently exaggerated in the chronic relapser; they are very charming, intelligent, manipulative, convincing, deceitful, lovable, talented and passionate; chronic relapsers have mastered the art of survival, in and out of treatment.

How to Help a Chronic Relapser

Below are ways to get involve, support, and encourage successful recovery for a chronic relapser.

Encourage a long-term length of stay. It is a well-established fact that long-term treatment increases the chances of lasting sobriety. It is important to define the term “long-term treatment” as in a length of stay in excess of nine months. It can take a chronic relapser three to six months to wake up out of the fog in which they have been living. Post-acute withdrawal syndrome (PAWS) is very significant in chronic relapsers and frequently interferes considerably with their ability to comprehend recovery principles in early sobriety.

Remove outside distractions. Chronic relapsers are masters at distracting themselves and others from seeing the truth about them. It is essential to remove all things they use to change the way they feel and to force them to sit in their own skin.  It is well within the boundaries the treatment center to limit distractions through therapeutic contracts, clear-cut facility rules and guidelines, and limited family contact. As a loved one or family member of a chronic relapser, be aware that you may be asked not to visit early on or often throughout treatment.

Emphasize the mental and spiritual nature of the disease. It is essential that chronic relapsers understand they have a disease of the mind body and spirit, and that the solution through the 12 Steps is spiritual in nature.

Be active in getting your own treatment. In most cases, the family has participated in the progression of the illness in the chronic relapser through intense enabling behaviors. Therapy for the family cannot just be a suggestion; it must be non-negotiable. Get involved with Al-Anon or Nar-Anon and consider counseling for yourself and other family members.

Put an end to enabling. Family leverage is usually the most significant in keeping a chronic relapser in long-term treatment. Chronic relapsers must recognize in no uncertain terms that they will not receive any emotional or financial support from their family if they do not complete long-term treatment or remain sober.

Stay one step ahead. It has been established that chronic relapsers are treatment-savvy, tricky and highly manipulative. When you, as the family, do get to speak and/or visit the chronic relapser, don’t take what they say at face value. Don’t give them an inch.

Emphasize that they work all 12 Steps with a sponsor. It is important that working the 12 Steps is not just a suggestion, but a requirement. These individuals must be held accountable to obtain a sponsor and work all 12 Steps while they are still in treatment.

Be relentless with accountability. Treatment for the chronic relapser should include a constant emphasis on accountability, responsibility and consistency. It is essential that there be rules, limits, boundaries and consequences with chronic relapsers. Family and friends can support but knowing what is expected of their loved one and reinforcing these policies and practices in their encounters with the chronic relapser.

Sources:

http://www.addictionpro.com/

http://www.merriam-webster.com/

https://en.wikipedia.org

 

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs

Once you know the ways to tell if someone is addicted to drugs it can be fairly easy to spot. Before knowing the signs of addiction it can be almost impossible to notice as well as understand what is going on with someone who has a drug problem. If you think there may even be a slight chance that someone you know is addicted to drugs then read on. In fact, if you think there is a chance you, yourself, might be addicted to drugs, then also, read on. This blog will explain how to know if someone is addicted to drugs.

 

  • They are neglecting their responsibilities at school, work, or home (e.g. flunking classes, skipping work, neglecting their children) because of their drug use.
  • They are using drugs under dangerous conditions or taking risks while high, such as driving while on drugs, using dirty needles, or having unprotected sex.
  • Their drug use is getting them into legal trouble, such as arrests for disorderly conduct, driving under the influence, or stealing to support a drug habit. 
  • Their drug use is causing problems in their relationships, such as fights with their partner or family members, an unhappy boss, or the loss of old friends.

How to Know if someone is Addicted to Drugs for the drug user

  • You’ve built up a drug tolerance. You need to use more of the drug to experience the same affects you used to attain with smaller amounts.
  • You take drugs to avoid or relieve withdrawal symptoms. If you go too long without drugs, you experience symptoms such as nausea, restlessness, insomnia, depression, sweating, shaking, and anxiety.
  • You’ve lost control over your drug use. You often do drugs or use more than you planned, even though you told yourself you wouldn’t. You may want to stop using, but you feel powerless.
  • Your life revolves around drug use. You spend a lot of time using and thinking about drugs, figuring out how to get them, and recovering from the drug’s effects.
  • You’ve abandoned activities you used to enjoy, such as hobbies, sports, and socializing, because of your drug use.
  • You continue to use drugs, despite knowing it’s hurting you. It’s causing major problems in your life—blackouts, infections, mood swings, depression, paranoia—but you use anyway

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs: Physical warning signs of drug addiction

  • Bloodshot eyes, pupils larger or smaller than usual
  • Changes in appetite or sleep patterns. Sudden weight loss or weight gain
  • Deterioration of physical appearance, personal grooming habits
  • Unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing
  • Tremors, slurred speech, or impaired coordination

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs: Behavioral signs of drug addiction

  • Drop in attendance and performance at work or school
  • Unexplained need for money or financial problems. May borrow or steal to get it.
  • Engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviors
  • Sudden change in friends, favorite hangouts, and hobbies
  • Frequently getting into trouble (fights, accidents, illegal activities)

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs: Psychological warning signs of drug addiction

  • Unexplained change in personality or attitude
  • Sudden mood swings, irritability, or angry outbursts
  • Periods of unusual hyperactivity, agitation, or giddiness
  • Lack of motivation; appears lethargic or “spaced out”
  • Appears fearful, anxious, or paranoid, with no reason

If you think you know someone is addicted to drugs the next step would be to try and help them or if it is you addicted to drugs, help yourself. There are many resources available today for people who are addicted to drugs including interventions, detox programs, inpatient treatment programs, outpatient programs and so much more. Someone who is addicted to drugs is going to need help. If they are unwilling to get help you cannot force them into getting better, remember that. What you can do, is let them know there is a way out if they want it.

Snorting Molly

Snorting Molly

 

Molly is a street name for the drug MDMA, in its purest form.  Molly is also known as Ecstasy, “X,” “E,” and “XTC.”

MDMA can induce euphoria, a sense of intimacy with others, and diminished anxiety. Many studies, particularly in the fields of psychology and cognitive therapy, have suggested MDMA has therapeutic benefits and facilitates therapy sessions in certain individuals, a practice for which it had been formally used in the past. Clinical trials are now testing the therapeutic potential of MDMA for post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety associated with terminal cancer, and addiction.

MDMA is a psychoactive drug with a chemical structure similar to the stimulant methamphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline. Ecstasy is an illegal drug that acts as both a stimulant and psychedelic, producing an energizing effect, as well as distortions in time and perception and enhanced enjoyment from physical touch.

Legality and Criminality

Although some limited exceptions exist for scientific and medical research, Ecstasy remains a Schedule I drug meaning that it has a high potential for abuse, has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and that there is a lack of accepted safety for use of MDMA.

One gram of MDMA (four Ecstasy pills at 250 mg per pill’s total weight regardless of purity, standard for Federal charges) is equivalent to one gram of heroin (approximately fifty doses) or 2.2 pounds (1.00 kg) of cannabis for sentencing purposes at the federal level.

Intoxicating Effects of Snorting Molly

The side effects from snorting Molly are similar to those when Ecstasy is taken in other forms and include difficulty concentrating, jaw clenching, grinding of the teeth, lack of appetite, and dry mouth and thirst.

The main differences between snorting Molly and eating it (swallowing it in what are called “parachutes” – MDMA powder wrapped in cigarette paper or toilet paper), are both the immediate physical sensation and intoxication level. Snorting Molly produces a burning sensation in the nostril(s). It also allows the intoxicating euphoric effects to hit more quickly. Eating Molly is different from snorting Molly in that it takes longer for the drug’s effects to kick in because it has to be ingested and then enter the bloodstream. However, by taking Molly by mouth, the effects are longer lasting than when snorting Molly.

After-effects/Withdrawal Symptoms from Snorting Molly

There are both psychological and physical after-effects from snorting Molly or from taking MDMA in any other form. The psychological effects include:

  • Anxiety and paranoia
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Impaired attention, focus, and concentration, as well as drive and motivation (due to depleted serotonin levels)
  • Residual feelings of empathy, emotional sensitivity, and a sense of closeness to others (afterglow)

The physical effects include:

  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or vertigo
  • Loss of appetite
  • Gastrointestinal disturbances, such as diarrhea or constipation
  • Insomnia
  • Aches and pains, usually from excessive physical activity (e.g., dancing)
  • Exhaustion
  • Jaw soreness from clenching and grinding teeth

 

Furthermore, it is important to be aware that using MDMA, Molly, or Ecstasy can result in serious damage to bodily organs, which can ultimately cause death. These risks include Cardiac dysfunction, arrest, myocardial infarction, and/or heart failure, hemorrhage and/or stroke, severe hyperthermia, organ failure, loss of consciousness, renal failure, and coma.

 

 

 

Sources:

www.wikipedia.org

http://www.drugs.com

Molly withdrawal symptoms

molly withdrawalMolly withdrawal symptoms

Molly is the purest form of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), most commonly known as Ecstasy. The nickname “Molly” stands for “molecule,” and has shown staying power in the way it helps transactions and users fly under the radar by sounding like a woman’s name. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Molly is an off-white powder that is generally sold in a gelatin capsule. It is often opened and poured into water or put on the inside lining of the mouth for the fastest absorption. The National Institute of Drug Abuse described effects as including feelings of mental stimulation, emotional warmth, empathy toward others, a general sense of well-being, and decreased anxiety. In addition, users report enhanced sensory perception as a hallmark of the MDMA experience, according to a 2011 release.

The following is a list of molly withdrawal symptoms that have been reported to occur when molly use is stopped:

  • Depression – This is one of the primary molly withdrawal symptoms that are reported by individuals who wish to stop using the drug; unfortunately, some of the cutting edge research in relation to ecstasy has reported that taking the drug just a couple of times could potentially cause long term brain damage that leads to depression. Researchers from the London Metropolitan University reported that individuals who had used molly just a few times had levels of depression that were up to four times greater than those who had never taken the drug. Although these particular individuals were not diagnosed with a serious case of clinical depression, using molly left them more emotionally vulnerable.

 

  • Sleeplessness – This is one of the most commonly molly withdrawal symptoms that occurs when a person attempts to stop using the drug. Many ecstasy users reported noticeable disruptions in sleep patterns as they ceased their molly intake. This molly withdrawal symptom is likely due to the fact that one of the many functions of serotonin is related to sleep regulation.

 

  • Agitation – This is a molly withdrawal symptom that is extremely common, and many individuals report initially becoming agitated as they ponder living with the drug, which is testimony to the strong psychological addiction that can occur with molly use. Molly users have reported that the drug can provoke such a profound experience that people will be much more likely to actively seek and consume the synthetic stimulant, regardless of the negative consequences that are related to this action. More often than not, a person who is going through the molly withdrawal process will reach for alcohol or various other types of drugs to help them to relax. This unfortunately will typically just become another addiction to any of these substitute chemicals.

 

  • Difficulty concentrating and Memory Problems – These are molly withdrawal symptoms that many former users will often complain about long after they have taken their last dose of the drug.

Molly addiction and dependence are very real, and individuals will typically go through molly withdrawal even after short-term use of the drug. Molly withdrawal can be overcome however, and drug rehab programs which are geared to treat molly addiction understand the severe symptoms that individuals will experience while coming off of the drug. Professional drug treatment counselors are prepared to help individuals get through these molly withdrawal symptoms and off of the drug for good.