What Can Molly Be Cut With?

What Can Molly Be Cut With?

what can molly be cut with

The term Molly refers to pure MDMA, which is a drug known for enhancing physical sensations. That is, the sense of touch is heightened, taste is altered and may seem different from the norm, and many people say that music sounds better. In general, there is an awareness of the moment and contentment with being in the moment.

After coming down, molly users experience the blues, also called Suicide Tuesday, but there are other more serious consequences. The involuntary jaw clenching that many users experience while high on molly can cause damage to their back teeth. Also, there have been numerous cases of Molly-induced hepatitis and, more seriously, liver failure. People who repeatedly take molly may also suffer from a range of psychological problems, like paranoia, anxiety, panic attacks, insomnia and nightmares.

Molly Is Not Always Pure

Because molly is a powder in substance and might be sold in capsules, it can be cut, or mixed with virtually anything. Cutting, or stepping on, the product is a practice among drug dealers in order to spread out the amount of the actual drug so as to increase profit. This results in the dilution of the drug, since it’s been mixed with other things, and therefore a less intense high.

Like other powder-like drugs, molly can be cut with anything from other less-expensive drugs to everyday, household items. Therefore, you can run more risk by taking molly because it is difficult to know the purity of the product as well as the possibility of side effects and interactions you may experience from whatever molly is cut with.

What Can Molly Be Cut With: Meth

Some people will describe an experience on molly that was different from other times in the past and since. They say they got a “speedy” batch, experiencing a much harder come-down where they crash for a couple of days afterwards. Likely, the molly they got was cut with meth or some other amphetamine.

What Can Molly Be Cut With: Heroin

Although unlikely because it just wouldn’t be profitable to do, I have heard stories of Molly possibly being cut with heroin. For some people, the idea of this is pretty scary but, if you think about it, heroin and molly are equally as scary. So why suddenly discriminate what it is you’re willing to put into your body?

What Can Molly Be Cut With: Everyday Items

Again, because it comes in a powder form, molly can be cut with anything else that resembles it, such as baby powder, laxatives, or baking soda. Most likely, you won’t really notice if this is the case except if you snort it or taste it first. Also, the main indication that your molly was cut with one of these substances or something like them is that your high will not be as intense as you are used to or were expecting.

So, what can molly be cut with? Anything you can think of really. Your best bet is to get a drug-testing kit so that you can be sure of what it is that you’re about to put in your body.

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

In active addiction, we often get caught up in a cycle of guilt and shame about using drugs and our using behaviors. On some level, we recognize that this isn’t our true identity yet the grip of addiction is so tight, that we cannot simply stop doing the things that we feel guilty and shameful about. And then, we use again and more in order to numb ourselves from the feelings of guilt and shame. This is essentially the cycle of thoughts, feelings, and behaviors that shows how guilt and shame fuels addiction.

How Guilt and Shame Fuels Addiction

The guilt and shame from the past leaves us feeling unworthy of being loved. As a result of the lies we tell ourselves, we have learned to lie in order to cover up who we believe we really are, and then we act out in ways that this guilt and shame fuels addiction.

We view our wrong behavior or failings as a reflection of who we are, our true identity.

When we do something bad or make a mistake, we take that as evidence that we are flawed.

We are very hard on ourselves and so normal errors and mistakes are blown out of proportion and reveal our true nature, which is flawed.

We feel overwhelmed when we experience such a mistake because we think it reveals that something is terribly wrong with us.

We accept part of the blame when others hurt, wrong, or violate us.

We see ourselves as someone who deserves to be abused, punished, or treated poorly.

We believe the behavior or lifestyle is the natural to us as bad people and therefore that it is futile to avoid or stop shame-producing behavior, further fueling addiction.

Whenever we experience a normal human failing, make an honest mistake, or suffer a disappointment, it triggers a downward spiral of depression and addictive behavior.

We think that trying to change our life for the better is somehow living a lie or being hypocritical, instead as evidence that we can change.

We may appear to be shameless to others when, in fact we are being eaten up by shame and guilt.

We are eventually worn down to the point that we give in to our overwhelming shame and then act out in ways that show no sense of shame or guilt.

 The Cycle of Guilt and Shame

When someone is addicted to alcohol and/or drugs, it usually causes them to feel guilt and shame about their addiction. When we can’t stop our addictive behavior, we think it means that there is some sort of weakness or inability on our part that makes us unworthy. We become dependent on something outside of ourselves (alcohol and drugs) to give a sense of well-being. We feel weak and needy on this substance which causes us to feel ashamed of our weakness, and then in turn intensifies our neediness. Addiction creates a cycle of ever increasing addictive behavior resulting in guilt and shame which in turn motivates an increase in dependence on the addiction for comfort.

 

 

 

Sources:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/

http://alcoholism.about.com/

Dangers of Molly the Drug (“molly the drug”)

Dangers of Molly the Drug (“molly the drug”)

We’re guessing you already know what molly is if you are wondering about the many dangers of molly the drug. But just in case you don’t know what molly the drug is let us clarify quickly what we are talking about;

We’re not talking about the girl you had a crush on in 5th grade math class or your best friend you spent your summers with, obviously.

We’re talking about Molly the drug.

Molly is the street name for pure MDMA. Molly is different than ecstasy pills or “E” because it comes in powder form or in capsules that are commonly more “clean” or pure than the “E” pills. The term Molly was derived from the word molecule. The idea that molly the drug is more pure gives its users, possibly you, the idea that is also safer. This just isn’t true. Molly the drug can be cut with other substances easily or it can be confused with other powdered substances. And this is just the beginning of the dangers of molly the drug.

So what does molly the drug do?

The primary effects of molly the drug are pretty consistent among all users. In general the molly drug takes on its effects within 45 minutes to an hour after consumption and hits a peak after 2 to 3 hours. After the peak molly drug hits a plateau that last about 2 to 3 more hours followed by a comedown. Molly the drug causes significant positive effects in its users. Effects such as:

•             An alteration in consciousness

•             A strong sense of inner peace and self-acceptance

•             Diminished fear, anxiety, and insecurity

•             Diminished aggression, hostility, and jealousy

•             Feelings of intimacy and love for others

•             Feelings of empathy, compassion and forgiveness towards others

•             Increased energy and endurance

•             Mild psychedelic, mental imagery and auditory and visual distortions or hallucinations

•             Improved self confidence

•             Increased drive, desire and motivation

•             The ability to talk about normally anxiety provoking issues

•             An intensification of all bodily senses

•             Stimulation, arousal and enhancement of appreciation of music

Now that you know how much fun molly the drug can be, it may be good if you ask the most important questions like, “what are the dangers of molly the drug?”

There are some immediate dangers to using the molly the drug. Molly the drug’s short-term side effects are quite alarming. Molly the drug interferes with the brain’s essential chemical functions. It kind of makes a scrambled egg out your brain. Molly the drug mixes up the temperature signals to the brain which can cause hypothermia, dehydration, or heat stroke.

The dangers of molly the drug are also things such as:

•             Blurred vision

•             Faintness

•             High blood pressure

•             Muscle cramping

•             Confusion

•             Panic attacks

So just how dangerous are the dangers of molly the drug?

Let’s just put it simply. You could die. You could also live. But the more important thing is that you realize the dangers of molly the drug; which in some worst case scenarios is death.

In some severe cases people have died from the dangers of molly the drug due to:

•             Seizures

•             Strokes

•             Cardiovascular and kidney failure

•             Dehydration

The amount of deaths involving molly the drug have increased because some people assume if you die from it you’re just not using it the “right way”.

Wait were not done with the dangers of molly the drug.

Another danger of molly the drug is that it has tons of interactions with other drugs. So if you’re planning on drinking a beer, doing some coke, LSD, or even taking just taking your allergy medicine with molly the drug-be careful. These molly drug cocktail combos can make the dangers of molly the drug, well, even more dangerous.

Your best bet against the dangers of molly the drug is just not to use it.

The best idea when using any drug is to know your facts and to be safe. Every drug including molly the drug has it dangers so it is best to just either practice abstaining or get as much information as you can on the substance.

The Most Dangerous Drug in The World

The Most Dangerous Drug in the World

I am not sure if you can label one drug as the most dangerous drug in the world but if you could and did many think it would be the notorious stimulant meth.  Meth is highly addictive, extremely hard to quit, insanely destructive and running rampant from major metropolitan areas to rural communities and then on into the world.

So what is it exactly about meth that makes it the most dangerous drug in the world? Let’s take a look.

Meth, otherwise known as: Crank, crypto, crystal, fire, glass, tweek, white cross, Tina, and crystal meth.

What is meth?

Meth or methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that strongly activates certain systems in the brain. Meth is usually a crystal-like powdered substance that can sometimes come in large rock-like chunks. When the powder flakes off the rock, the shards look like glass which is actually a nickname for meth. Meth is usually white or slightly yellow depending on the purity of it. Meth can be used by mouth, snorted through the nose, smoked or inhaled, and also injected with a needle (IV use).

Because of meth’s different and numerous methods of use as well as its ability to activate the pleasure centers of the brain definitely help to make it one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

What are the harmful effects of meth?

Part of the intense addiction to meth stems from what meth users call a “rush”. Shortly after smoking or injecting meth, meth users feel an intense sensation of euphoria that only lasts a few minutes and is described as extremely pleasurable. Snorting or swallowing meth produces euphoria (the high) but not the “rush” of it. After the initial “rush,” there is usually a state of high agitation that in some individuals can lead to violent behavior. This is can either be due to the effects of the drug or because they want more of it. Other possible immediate effects of meth include increased wakefulness and insomnia, decreased appetite, irritability/aggression, anxiety, nervousness, convulsions and heart attack.

What are its long-term effects? These long term effects are part of what makes meth one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

Methamphetamine is addictive, and users can develop a tolerance quickly, needing larger amounts to get high. In some cases, users forego food and sleep and take more meth every few hours for days, ‘binging’ until they run out of the drug or become too disorganized to continue. Chronic use can cause paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive behavior (such as compulsively cleaning, grooming or disassembling and assembling objects), and delusions of parasites or insects crawling under the skin. Users can obsessively scratch their skin to get rid of these imagined insects. Long-term use, high dosages, or both can bring on full-blown toxic psychosis (often exhibited as violent, aggressive behavior). This violent, aggressive behavior is usually coupled with extreme paranoia. Methamphetamine use can also cause strokes and death.

Recovery from meth addiction is also extremely difficult due to the nature of the drug. Many people who are meth addicts will relapse time and time again. This is because of the intense high and effects methamphetamine has on the brain and the body.

Either way meth is definitely one of the most dangerous drugs in the world. If not, the most dangerous drug in the world.

 

 

 

 

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs

Once you know the ways to tell if someone is addicted to drugs it can be fairly easy to spot. Before knowing the signs of addiction it can be almost impossible to notice as well as understand what is going on with someone who has a drug problem. If you think there may even be a slight chance that someone you know is addicted to drugs then read on. In fact, if you think there is a chance you, yourself, might be addicted to drugs, then also, read on. This blog will explain how to know if someone is addicted to drugs.

 

  • They are neglecting their responsibilities at school, work, or home (e.g. flunking classes, skipping work, neglecting their children) because of their drug use.
  • They are using drugs under dangerous conditions or taking risks while high, such as driving while on drugs, using dirty needles, or having unprotected sex.
  • Their drug use is getting them into legal trouble, such as arrests for disorderly conduct, driving under the influence, or stealing to support a drug habit. 
  • Their drug use is causing problems in their relationships, such as fights with their partner or family members, an unhappy boss, or the loss of old friends.

How to Know if someone is Addicted to Drugs for the drug user

  • You’ve built up a drug tolerance. You need to use more of the drug to experience the same affects you used to attain with smaller amounts.
  • You take drugs to avoid or relieve withdrawal symptoms. If you go too long without drugs, you experience symptoms such as nausea, restlessness, insomnia, depression, sweating, shaking, and anxiety.
  • You’ve lost control over your drug use. You often do drugs or use more than you planned, even though you told yourself you wouldn’t. You may want to stop using, but you feel powerless.
  • Your life revolves around drug use. You spend a lot of time using and thinking about drugs, figuring out how to get them, and recovering from the drug’s effects.
  • You’ve abandoned activities you used to enjoy, such as hobbies, sports, and socializing, because of your drug use.
  • You continue to use drugs, despite knowing it’s hurting you. It’s causing major problems in your life—blackouts, infections, mood swings, depression, paranoia—but you use anyway

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs: Physical warning signs of drug addiction

  • Bloodshot eyes, pupils larger or smaller than usual
  • Changes in appetite or sleep patterns. Sudden weight loss or weight gain
  • Deterioration of physical appearance, personal grooming habits
  • Unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing
  • Tremors, slurred speech, or impaired coordination

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs: Behavioral signs of drug addiction

  • Drop in attendance and performance at work or school
  • Unexplained need for money or financial problems. May borrow or steal to get it.
  • Engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviors
  • Sudden change in friends, favorite hangouts, and hobbies
  • Frequently getting into trouble (fights, accidents, illegal activities)

How to know if someone is addicted to drugs: Psychological warning signs of drug addiction

  • Unexplained change in personality or attitude
  • Sudden mood swings, irritability, or angry outbursts
  • Periods of unusual hyperactivity, agitation, or giddiness
  • Lack of motivation; appears lethargic or “spaced out”
  • Appears fearful, anxious, or paranoid, with no reason

If you think you know someone is addicted to drugs the next step would be to try and help them or if it is you addicted to drugs, help yourself. There are many resources available today for people who are addicted to drugs including interventions, detox programs, inpatient treatment programs, outpatient programs and so much more. Someone who is addicted to drugs is going to need help. If they are unwilling to get help you cannot force them into getting better, remember that. What you can do, is let them know there is a way out if they want it.

Snorting Molly

Snorting Molly

 

Molly is a street name for the drug MDMA, in its purest form.  Molly is also known as Ecstasy, “X,” “E,” and “XTC.”

MDMA can induce euphoria, a sense of intimacy with others, and diminished anxiety. Many studies, particularly in the fields of psychology and cognitive therapy, have suggested MDMA has therapeutic benefits and facilitates therapy sessions in certain individuals, a practice for which it had been formally used in the past. Clinical trials are now testing the therapeutic potential of MDMA for post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety associated with terminal cancer, and addiction.

MDMA is a psychoactive drug with a chemical structure similar to the stimulant methamphetamine and the hallucinogen mescaline. Ecstasy is an illegal drug that acts as both a stimulant and psychedelic, producing an energizing effect, as well as distortions in time and perception and enhanced enjoyment from physical touch.

Legality and Criminality

Although some limited exceptions exist for scientific and medical research, Ecstasy remains a Schedule I drug meaning that it has a high potential for abuse, has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States, and that there is a lack of accepted safety for use of MDMA.

One gram of MDMA (four Ecstasy pills at 250 mg per pill’s total weight regardless of purity, standard for Federal charges) is equivalent to one gram of heroin (approximately fifty doses) or 2.2 pounds (1.00 kg) of cannabis for sentencing purposes at the federal level.

Intoxicating Effects of Snorting Molly

The side effects from snorting Molly are similar to those when Ecstasy is taken in other forms and include difficulty concentrating, jaw clenching, grinding of the teeth, lack of appetite, and dry mouth and thirst.

The main differences between snorting Molly and eating it (swallowing it in what are called “parachutes” – MDMA powder wrapped in cigarette paper or toilet paper), are both the immediate physical sensation and intoxication level. Snorting Molly produces a burning sensation in the nostril(s). It also allows the intoxicating euphoric effects to hit more quickly. Eating Molly is different from snorting Molly in that it takes longer for the drug’s effects to kick in because it has to be ingested and then enter the bloodstream. However, by taking Molly by mouth, the effects are longer lasting than when snorting Molly.

After-effects/Withdrawal Symptoms from Snorting Molly

There are both psychological and physical after-effects from snorting Molly or from taking MDMA in any other form. The psychological effects include:

  • Anxiety and paranoia
  • Depression
  • Irritability
  • Fatigue
  • Impaired attention, focus, and concentration, as well as drive and motivation (due to depleted serotonin levels)
  • Residual feelings of empathy, emotional sensitivity, and a sense of closeness to others (afterglow)

The physical effects include:

  • Dizziness, lightheadedness, or vertigo
  • Loss of appetite
  • Gastrointestinal disturbances, such as diarrhea or constipation
  • Insomnia
  • Aches and pains, usually from excessive physical activity (e.g., dancing)
  • Exhaustion
  • Jaw soreness from clenching and grinding teeth

 

Furthermore, it is important to be aware that using MDMA, Molly, or Ecstasy can result in serious damage to bodily organs, which can ultimately cause death. These risks include Cardiac dysfunction, arrest, myocardial infarction, and/or heart failure, hemorrhage and/or stroke, severe hyperthermia, organ failure, loss of consciousness, renal failure, and coma.

 

 

 

Sources:

www.wikipedia.org

http://www.drugs.com

Molly withdrawal symptoms

molly withdrawalMolly withdrawal symptoms

Molly is the purest form of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), most commonly known as Ecstasy. The nickname “Molly” stands for “molecule,” and has shown staying power in the way it helps transactions and users fly under the radar by sounding like a woman’s name. According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, Molly is an off-white powder that is generally sold in a gelatin capsule. It is often opened and poured into water or put on the inside lining of the mouth for the fastest absorption. The National Institute of Drug Abuse described effects as including feelings of mental stimulation, emotional warmth, empathy toward others, a general sense of well-being, and decreased anxiety. In addition, users report enhanced sensory perception as a hallmark of the MDMA experience, according to a 2011 release.

The following is a list of molly withdrawal symptoms that have been reported to occur when molly use is stopped:

  • Depression – This is one of the primary molly withdrawal symptoms that are reported by individuals who wish to stop using the drug; unfortunately, some of the cutting edge research in relation to ecstasy has reported that taking the drug just a couple of times could potentially cause long term brain damage that leads to depression. Researchers from the London Metropolitan University reported that individuals who had used molly just a few times had levels of depression that were up to four times greater than those who had never taken the drug. Although these particular individuals were not diagnosed with a serious case of clinical depression, using molly left them more emotionally vulnerable.

 

  • Sleeplessness – This is one of the most commonly molly withdrawal symptoms that occurs when a person attempts to stop using the drug. Many ecstasy users reported noticeable disruptions in sleep patterns as they ceased their molly intake. This molly withdrawal symptom is likely due to the fact that one of the many functions of serotonin is related to sleep regulation.

 

  • Agitation – This is a molly withdrawal symptom that is extremely common, and many individuals report initially becoming agitated as they ponder living with the drug, which is testimony to the strong psychological addiction that can occur with molly use. Molly users have reported that the drug can provoke such a profound experience that people will be much more likely to actively seek and consume the synthetic stimulant, regardless of the negative consequences that are related to this action. More often than not, a person who is going through the molly withdrawal process will reach for alcohol or various other types of drugs to help them to relax. This unfortunately will typically just become another addiction to any of these substitute chemicals.

 

  • Difficulty concentrating and Memory Problems – These are molly withdrawal symptoms that many former users will often complain about long after they have taken their last dose of the drug.

Molly addiction and dependence are very real, and individuals will typically go through molly withdrawal even after short-term use of the drug. Molly withdrawal can be overcome however, and drug rehab programs which are geared to treat molly addiction understand the severe symptoms that individuals will experience while coming off of the drug. Professional drug treatment counselors are prepared to help individuals get through these molly withdrawal symptoms and off of the drug for good.

Fun Things to do on the 4th of July without alcohol

how to have fun on the fourth of july without alcohol

The 4th of July; the United States of America’s Independence Day. The 4th of July has become a tradition filled with barbeques, fireworks, and well, drinking, beer especially and maybe some sweet tea or lemonade. Either way, July 4th is the quintessential summer holiday for those looking for a reason to party right smack dab in the middle of the hottest and sunniest days of the year. Luckily, for those of us in recovery, while drinking may have been a part of our 4th of July tradition, there are fun things to do on the 4th of July without alcohol. For instance check out the list below!

  • Attend sober barbeques/parties
  • Attend festivities with sober supports, such as sober friends and/or your sponsor for accountability and support
  • Remember that you don’t have to attend every party that you’ve been invited to
  • Attend a 12 Step meeting that morning or during the day or that evening
  • Check your motives, make sure you are in a spiritually fit place, get input from people whom you trust, such as your sponsor
  • Do something different, start your own 4th of July tradition such as a deep-sea fishing trip, going to the amusement park, museums, art shows
  • Throw a party at your place and make it known to your guests that it’s a BYON-AB Party (Bring Your Own Non-Alcoholic Beverage)
  • Do volunteer work: help out at your local pet shelter, homeless shelter, nursing home, or hospital
  • Go to the beach either to hang out or to watch fireworks
  • Have a picnic
  • Go to the dog park! Dogs enjoy the 4th of July without alcohol too!
  • Go hiking, tour your local botanical garden, go boating, and learn to paddle board.
  • Maybe head over to the boardwalk, go wakeboarding, or lay out by the pool.
  • Run a 5k, 10k or half marathon
  • Go to a local sports event-baseball game.
  • Have a bonfire, make smores, camp!

All of these are fun things to do on the 4th of July without alcohol. If you find some of these things that are on the list of fun things to do on the 4th of July without alcohol are things you normally would do with alcohol either don’t do them and do something new, do them anyway and see how much fun they are, or do it with a bunch of sober friends.

The 4th of July doesn’t have to be about alcohol in fact it really shouldn’t be. The 4th of July is our Independence day and really what we are celebrating is the great freedom we have in getting to do something such as celebrate the 4th of July anyway we want! And if you are looking for fun things to do on the 4th of July without alcohol, well, it’s pretty much anything you want to do just minus the alcoholic beverages. Bonus of fun things to do on the 4th of July without alcohol is that you don’t wake up on the 5th with a hangover too. So get out there and enjoy your Independence; as a country and as a sober individual!

What is Recovery?

What is Recovery?

Recovery from addiction is a journey not a destination. Addiction does not happen overnight, it takes time, therefore recovery also takes time. Addiction and alcoholism are defined as diseases. Addiction is the physical dependence on any mind or mood altering substance and the continued use regardless of consequences. Addiction is not a moral deficiency but rather a disease of the mind, body and spirit. Most people who become addicted cannot using drugs or drinking simply because they want to or “will” themselves to. Most people who suffer from addiction or alcoholism must seek outside help or an outside solution rather to help them get sober and then remain sober as they journey into recovery.

Sobriety is the cessation of drug use or drinking after an addiction has been formed. In order to remain sober addicts and alcoholics must find help from an outside source because they cannot find sobriety or gain sobriety on their own. Most of the time addicts and alcoholics who want to be in sobriety have tried many times to be sober on their own and have not been capable of it. This is why drug and alcohol treatment centers are available to anyone suffering with disease of alcoholism or addiction. Sobriety and the help to get sober is offered in the form of detox, inpatient treatment, outpatient treatment, and support groups at these drug and alcohol treatment centers. Sobriety is not recovery though and in order to truly recover from the disease of alcoholism and addiction something more than just drug and alcohol treatment must be completed. This is where some kind of solution based therapy comes into play in order for the journey to recovery to begin.

Most people who want recovery begin by looking into 12 step programs because the term recovered is used in such self-help groups. Recovery is not only just the cessation of drug use and drinking but also the ability to live life effectively and usefully without the use of drugs and alcohol. This is why recovery is a lifestyle and not so much a destination that people reach once they get sober. Recovery is a way of living. More people than not find recovery in their 12 step fellowship such as AA or NA because it treats all three aspects of the disease of addiction. 12 step fellowships offer recovery because they give the addict or alcoholic not only the chance to stay sober but also steps to live a more effective and useful life. The 12 step programs of recovery offer a spiritual solution to a disease which includes a spiritual malady or maladjustment to life.

Recovery begins as soon as an addict or alcoholic’s behavior, ideals, ideas, thoughts, and actions change for the better. Recovery is not merely living life and battling against wanting to use drugs but finding the solution so they may never thinking of drugs or drinking again. Recovery allows this because it teaches a new way of life.

 

3 Ways You Are Enabling Newcomers

3 Ways You Are Enabling Newcomers

Most of the time when you think of enabling and enablers, especially when it comes to addicts and alcoholics you think of the family or loved ones. But enabling is something that can happen between any people in any type of relationship, including the relationship between newcomers and people with more clean time.

So what is enabling?

Enabling is “removing the natural consequences to the newcomer of his or her behavior.” People with more clean time will often feel compelled to solve a newcomer’s problems. If they’re involved with them deeply, they usually end up taking on the irresponsible addict’s responsibilities. Their behavior starts as a well-intentioned desire to help, but in later stages of addiction, they act out of desperation. The dynamics between friends, newcomer and person with more clean time or even sponsor and sponsee, become skewed, so that the person with more clean time increasingly over-functions and the newcomer increasingly under-functions. This builds resentment on both sides, along with the newcomer’s expectation that the person with more clean time will continue to make things right when they doesn’t meet his or her responsibilities.

Here are 3 ways you are enabling newcomers:

  • Giving them money: Most newcomers are broke. For the most part this is usually true. They have no job and have been scrounging up money most of their lives to fund their drinking or using habit. It can seem really tempting to give a newcomer money but this is enabling them. A newcomer needs to learn how to stand on their own two feet, especially when it comes to money. They should be finding a job and won’t have the drive or desperation to if they aren’t suffering the consequences of having no money.
  • Fulfilling their commitments to others: If a newcomer has made a commitment to be somewhere and can’t show up you don’t show up for them. You also don’t save them if for some reason they want to flake out on a ride somewhere. A way you are enabling a newcomer is by making excuses for them. Let them handle their own responsibilities and suffer the consequences if they are being accountable. This is how a newcomer will learn.
  • Bailing them out of jail: If for whatever reason a newcomer you know relapses and goes to jail or relapses in a halfway house and has nowhere to go. Enabling is letting them stay in the halfway house and enabling is bailing them out of jail. This is another scenario where letting them suffer the consequences is when they will learn. It is not your job to save them or make sure they don’t have to deal with the pain of their decisions. If a newcomer chooses to relapse they know the rules of the halfway house and the law so if they end up paying for that; they should deal with the consequences.

Enabling a newcomer can be very dangerous because they are teetering a fine line of trying to stay sober but not sure if they want to be sober. Enabling can make it easy for them to do what they want and stay in sick behavior. They will begin getting well when they have to suffer their own consequences and learn from their mistakes instead of being saved from them.