5 Signs You Are An Addict

5 Signs You Are An Addict

This may seem funny or obvious to some people but, when in the tight grip of a drug addiction, it can be hard to see what is really going on. Addiction is an insidious condition that can sneak up on you and before you know it, that recreational drug use you like to call “partying” has become a full-blown addiction. Often referred to as denial, it’s like the saying goes, “you can’t see the forest for the trees.” Here are five telltale signs you are an addict.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Tolerance

You find that you need more and more of a substance or substances in order to achieve the same effect that you used to get when you first started using. This means that you have built up a tolerance to the drug or drugs.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Dependence

If you try to stop or go too long without drugs, you experience symptoms such as nausea, restlessness, insomnia, depression, sweating, shaking, and anxiety. You find that you need to take drugs to avoid or relieve these withdrawal symptoms. This is known as physical dependence.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Loss of Control

You can no longer reel yourself in or limit your drug use; you’ve lost control over it. You often tell yourself you won’t use but then find yourself using or using more than you had planned. You may want to stop using, but you feel like you are unable to stop. In a word, powerless.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Obsession

You spend a lot of time and money using and thinking about drugs, and figuring out ways to get them, and recovering from their effects. You start to realize that your life revolves around your drug use. This is the psychological dependence of being an addict.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Lack of Interest

You’ve abandoned activities you used to enjoy, such as hobbies, sports, and socializing, because of your drug use. You don’t spend time with friends or family, instead, the only people, if any, that you hang out with are now your “using” buddies. One of the most obvious signs you are an addict to others is that you have an overall lack of interest in life.

5 Signs You Are An Addict: Consequences

You start experience a number of different consequences: health, financial, social/relationship, even legal, yet you continue to use drugs. Despite knowing it’s hurting you, you simply cannot stop your drug use. It’s causing major problems in your life—blackouts, infections, mood swings, depression, paranoia, loss of your job, drug-related arrests—but you use anyway.

 

The good news is that drug addiction is a condition that is treatable. If you or someone you love is showing signs of being an addict, there is drug treatment available for substance abuse and addiction. You don’t have to go on suffering. Recognizing the signs you are an addict is the first step in getting help and getting your life back on track.

 

 

 

Source:

http://www.helpguide.org/

 

 

3 Ways You Are Enabling Newcomers

3 Ways You Are Enabling Newcomers

Most of the time when you think of enabling and enablers, especially when it comes to addicts and alcoholics you think of the family or loved ones. But enabling is something that can happen between any people in any type of relationship, including the relationship between newcomers and people with more clean time.

So what is enabling?

Enabling is “removing the natural consequences to the newcomer of his or her behavior.” People with more clean time will often feel compelled to solve a newcomer’s problems. If they’re involved with them deeply, they usually end up taking on the irresponsible addict’s responsibilities. Their behavior starts as a well-intentioned desire to help, but in later stages of addiction, they act out of desperation. The dynamics between friends, newcomer and person with more clean time or even sponsor and sponsee, become skewed, so that the person with more clean time increasingly over-functions and the newcomer increasingly under-functions. This builds resentment on both sides, along with the newcomer’s expectation that the person with more clean time will continue to make things right when they doesn’t meet his or her responsibilities.

Here are 3 ways you are enabling newcomers:

  • Giving them money: Most newcomers are broke. For the most part this is usually true. They have no job and have been scrounging up money most of their lives to fund their drinking or using habit. It can seem really tempting to give a newcomer money but this is enabling them. A newcomer needs to learn how to stand on their own two feet, especially when it comes to money. They should be finding a job and won’t have the drive or desperation to if they aren’t suffering the consequences of having no money.
  • Fulfilling their commitments to others: If a newcomer has made a commitment to be somewhere and can’t show up you don’t show up for them. You also don’t save them if for some reason they want to flake out on a ride somewhere. A way you are enabling a newcomer is by making excuses for them. Let them handle their own responsibilities and suffer the consequences if they are being accountable. This is how a newcomer will learn.
  • Bailing them out of jail: If for whatever reason a newcomer you know relapses and goes to jail or relapses in a halfway house and has nowhere to go. Enabling is letting them stay in the halfway house and enabling is bailing them out of jail. This is another scenario where letting them suffer the consequences is when they will learn. It is not your job to save them or make sure they don’t have to deal with the pain of their decisions. If a newcomer chooses to relapse they know the rules of the halfway house and the law so if they end up paying for that; they should deal with the consequences.

Enabling a newcomer can be very dangerous because they are teetering a fine line of trying to stay sober but not sure if they want to be sober. Enabling can make it easy for them to do what they want and stay in sick behavior. They will begin getting well when they have to suffer their own consequences and learn from their mistakes instead of being saved from them.