The Most Dangerous Drug in The World

The Most Dangerous Drug in the World

I am not sure if you can label one drug as the most dangerous drug in the world but if you could and did many think it would be the notorious stimulant meth.  Meth is highly addictive, extremely hard to quit, insanely destructive and running rampant from major metropolitan areas to rural communities and then on into the world.

So what is it exactly about meth that makes it the most dangerous drug in the world? Let’s take a look.

Meth, otherwise known as: Crank, crypto, crystal, fire, glass, tweek, white cross, Tina, and crystal meth.

What is meth?

Meth or methamphetamine is an addictive stimulant that strongly activates certain systems in the brain. Meth is usually a crystal-like powdered substance that can sometimes come in large rock-like chunks. When the powder flakes off the rock, the shards look like glass which is actually a nickname for meth. Meth is usually white or slightly yellow depending on the purity of it. Meth can be used by mouth, snorted through the nose, smoked or inhaled, and also injected with a needle (IV use).

Because of meth’s different and numerous methods of use as well as its ability to activate the pleasure centers of the brain definitely help to make it one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

What are the harmful effects of meth?

Part of the intense addiction to meth stems from what meth users call a “rush”. Shortly after smoking or injecting meth, meth users feel an intense sensation of euphoria that only lasts a few minutes and is described as extremely pleasurable. Snorting or swallowing meth produces euphoria (the high) but not the “rush” of it. After the initial “rush,” there is usually a state of high agitation that in some individuals can lead to violent behavior. This is can either be due to the effects of the drug or because they want more of it. Other possible immediate effects of meth include increased wakefulness and insomnia, decreased appetite, irritability/aggression, anxiety, nervousness, convulsions and heart attack.

What are its long-term effects? These long term effects are part of what makes meth one of the most dangerous drugs in the world.

Methamphetamine is addictive, and users can develop a tolerance quickly, needing larger amounts to get high. In some cases, users forego food and sleep and take more meth every few hours for days, ‘binging’ until they run out of the drug or become too disorganized to continue. Chronic use can cause paranoia, hallucinations, repetitive behavior (such as compulsively cleaning, grooming or disassembling and assembling objects), and delusions of parasites or insects crawling under the skin. Users can obsessively scratch their skin to get rid of these imagined insects. Long-term use, high dosages, or both can bring on full-blown toxic psychosis (often exhibited as violent, aggressive behavior). This violent, aggressive behavior is usually coupled with extreme paranoia. Methamphetamine use can also cause strokes and death.

Recovery from meth addiction is also extremely difficult due to the nature of the drug. Many people who are meth addicts will relapse time and time again. This is because of the intense high and effects methamphetamine has on the brain and the body.

Either way meth is definitely one of the most dangerous drugs in the world. If not, the most dangerous drug in the world.

 

 

 

 

3 Ways You Are Enabling Newcomers

3 Ways You Are Enabling Newcomers

Most of the time when you think of enabling and enablers, especially when it comes to addicts and alcoholics you think of the family or loved ones. But enabling is something that can happen between any people in any type of relationship, including the relationship between newcomers and people with more clean time.

So what is enabling?

Enabling is “removing the natural consequences to the newcomer of his or her behavior.” People with more clean time will often feel compelled to solve a newcomer’s problems. If they’re involved with them deeply, they usually end up taking on the irresponsible addict’s responsibilities. Their behavior starts as a well-intentioned desire to help, but in later stages of addiction, they act out of desperation. The dynamics between friends, newcomer and person with more clean time or even sponsor and sponsee, become skewed, so that the person with more clean time increasingly over-functions and the newcomer increasingly under-functions. This builds resentment on both sides, along with the newcomer’s expectation that the person with more clean time will continue to make things right when they doesn’t meet his or her responsibilities.

Here are 3 ways you are enabling newcomers:

  • Giving them money: Most newcomers are broke. For the most part this is usually true. They have no job and have been scrounging up money most of their lives to fund their drinking or using habit. It can seem really tempting to give a newcomer money but this is enabling them. A newcomer needs to learn how to stand on their own two feet, especially when it comes to money. They should be finding a job and won’t have the drive or desperation to if they aren’t suffering the consequences of having no money.
  • Fulfilling their commitments to others: If a newcomer has made a commitment to be somewhere and can’t show up you don’t show up for them. You also don’t save them if for some reason they want to flake out on a ride somewhere. A way you are enabling a newcomer is by making excuses for them. Let them handle their own responsibilities and suffer the consequences if they are being accountable. This is how a newcomer will learn.
  • Bailing them out of jail: If for whatever reason a newcomer you know relapses and goes to jail or relapses in a halfway house and has nowhere to go. Enabling is letting them stay in the halfway house and enabling is bailing them out of jail. This is another scenario where letting them suffer the consequences is when they will learn. It is not your job to save them or make sure they don’t have to deal with the pain of their decisions. If a newcomer chooses to relapse they know the rules of the halfway house and the law so if they end up paying for that; they should deal with the consequences.

Enabling a newcomer can be very dangerous because they are teetering a fine line of trying to stay sober but not sure if they want to be sober. Enabling can make it easy for them to do what they want and stay in sick behavior. They will begin getting well when they have to suffer their own consequences and learn from their mistakes instead of being saved from them.